HTii now offers clients architecture production capability

HTii now offers program offices and requirements owners the ability to create enterprise architecture products in compliance with the Department of Defense Architecture Framework (DoDAF).

Architecture creates models of complex systems using standardized graphics and data formats so that managers can share organized, consistent information and make decisions more effectively.

GIG2-0

Architectural model of global information grid, GIG 2.0 – Characteristics, Goals, and JCA Relationship (from The Global Information Grid (GIG) 2.0 Concept of Operations, Version 1.1, 11 March 2009.) Data and models showing more detail underlie the text and graphical elements in the global model.

HTii inaugurated the new architecture service, which includes storage in a secure data repository, in response to the shortage of trained personnel in programs that now have to meet DoDAF requirements.

“DoD now mandates architecture frameworks for all major weapons and information technology system procurements, but there aren’t currently enough architects available to meet the demand,” said Adam Hammett, who manages DoDAF architecture efforts for HTii. “That’s why we’ve created this capability for our clients.”

Hammett, who has an MS in Systems Engineering from Johns Hopkins University, is a Certified Enterprise Architect with a concentration in DoDAF. He received his certification from the FEAC Institute, the premier training and certification institution for enterprise architects.

Hammett has drawn from HTii’s staff of experienced requirements managers and database developers to create an enterprise architecture capability that can support the efforts of its government and industry counterparts. The HTii group employs industry-standard architecture software tools including IBM Rational Software Architect (RSA), IBM Rational DOORS, Vitech CORE 9, and Microsoft Visio.

A particular strength of the group is its years of experience managing requirements for NAVAIR weapons systems. “We can link requirements directly to functions and capabilities modeled in the architectural framework,” Hammett said. “That allows managers to see functional gaps that are not apparent from a simple list of requirements in a specification.”

Detail from GIG 2.0 Architectural Model, showing how joint infrastructure enables shared information services to joint warfighters and mission partners, business support personnel, intelligence personnel, and systems from the tactical edge to any global location.

Detail from GIG 2.0 Architectural Model, showing how joint infrastructure enables shared information services to joint warfighters and mission partners, business support personnel, intelligence personnel, and systems from the tactical edge to any global location.

In an architectural framework, the graphical depiction of a complex system shows the relationships and interactions among its component parts. Data, including requirements, underlies the graphical objects so that all information available on the system can be accessed in its entirety.

Graphical depictions can be made interactive as well; changes made to one component of an architecturally modeled system will then show up as effects on others.

“It’s much more than just PowerPoint diagrams,” Hammett said. “An architectural framework creates actionable data. That’s data you can make informed decisions with.”